home
dvd

Poland 1988

Colour

Polish with
English subtitles

Presented in the original 4:3 aspect ratio

Dolby Digital 1.0

Disc 1: 165 minutes

Disc 2: 112 minutes

ART024-ADVD

SPECIAL FEATURES

Krzysztof Kieslowski biography and filmography

Dekalog (Parts 1 to 5)
The Film Director Credits Cast Press Quotes Images

DEKALOG (PARTS 1 TO 5)

Dekalog, from the acclaimed director of the 'Three Colours' trilogy, was premiered to unanimous glowing critical praise at the 1989 Venice Film Festival and its reputation as a cinematic masterpiece remains undiminished.

The ten hour-long films, loosely based on the Ten Commandments, are all equally captivating and powerful.
The stories are set around the same modern Warsaw apartment block and focus on the complexities of human relationships. The themes are the universal ones of love, marriage, infidelity, parenthood, guilt, faith and compassion.
The result is a unique and life-enhancing look at the various moral dilemmas faced by ordinary people in their daily lives.

Dekalog 1: I am the Lord thy God. Thou shalt have no other God but me
- A deeply moving story of the trust and affection between a father and his son.
Dekalog 2: Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain
- A lonely elderly hospital consultant is asked by a patient's wife to predict her husband's chances of survival as she is pregnant by another man.
Dekalog 3: Honour the Sabbath Day
- On a dark wintry Christmas Eve, Janusz is persuaded by his former lover to drive her all over Warsaw in search of her missing husband.
Dekalog 4: Honour thy father and thy mother
- Anka is a young drama student who has a close relationship with her widowed father. When he goes on a trip abroad Anka finds a letter revealing that he may not in fact be her real father.
Dekalog 5: Thou shalt not kill
- A young man brutally murders a taxi driver and is in turn hanged by the state. Graphically filmed in harrowing detail, Dekalog 5 was originally shown as the extended feature-length film A Short Film About Killing which was named Best Film at the European Film Awards in 1988, as well as winning the Jury Prize at Cannes and the Golden Lion at Gdansk.
rating