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France/Switzerland 1983

Colour

French with
English subtitles

Enhanced for widescreen TVs

Dolby Digital 2.0

82 minutes

ART036DVD

SPECIAL FEATURES

2 Interviews with Robert Bresson

Interview with Marguerite Duras

Theatrical trailer

L'Argent
The Film Director Credits Cast Press Quotes Images

ROBERT BRESSON Director & Screenwriter

Robert Bresson was one of the foremost artists of French cinema, whose work displayed a singular vision and an unmistakable style.
Reducing his art to the barest essentials, Bresson's uncompromising films were immune to passing cinematic fashions, yet his influence has been acknowledged by such directors as Andrei Tarkovsky, Martin Scorsese and Bernado Bertolucci. Although he made just thirteen features Bresson continued working into his eighties, leaving a remarkable legacy of enduring cinematic masterpieces.

Selected Filmography

1983 - L'ARGENT (Money)DVD
1977 - THE DEVIL, PROBABLY (Le Diable Probablement)DVD
1974 - LANCELOT DU LAC (Lancelot of the Lake)DVD
1970 - QUATRE NUITS D'UN REVEUR (FOUR NIGHTS OF A DREAMER)
1969 - UNE FEMME DOUCE (A GENTLE CREATE)
1966 - MOUCHETTEDVDBlu-ray
1965 - AU HASARD BALTHAZARDVD
1961 - THE TRIAL OF JOAN OF ARC (Le Proces de Jeanne D'arc)DVD
1959 - PICKPOCKETDVD
1956 - A MAN ESCAPED (Un Condamne a Mort s'est Echappé ou Le Vent Souffle ou Il Veut)DVD
1944 - LES DAMES DU BOIS DE BOULOGNE
1944 - JOURNAL D'UN CURE DE CAMPAGNE (DIARY OF A COUNTRY PRIEST)
1943 - LES ANGES DU PECHE

'Bresson is clearly not a film-maker for everybody, but he has pursued his own way remorselessly for the
best part of 40 years and he has a very faithful audience. His literary adaptations - from Giraudoux, Diderot, Bernanos and Dostoevsky - are often merely points of departure.
For him, 'the most important ideas in a film are the most hidden', so the watcher has to look hard to find them.
It is not an easy process but it is a rewarding one since you feel he has a profound understanding of what he is talking about. His films have little or nothing to do with those of the French New Wave but a lot to do with his Catholic background and the fact that he spent 18 months in a German prison camp during the Second World War. Prison also features 'Les Anges du Péché', 'Un Condamné à Mort s'est Echappé' and 'The Trial of Joan of Arc'. And most of his central characters seem imprisoned, if only in the soul, either through their misfortunes or because society has made it inevitable. If this seems a gloomy process through which to journey, there are always points in his films where redemption and exaltation prevent glumness.'

- Derek Malcolm, The Guardian, 19 August 1999.